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dc.contributor.authorGreyling, Johannes Cornelis Arnoldus
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-25T14:03:59Z
dc.date.available2009-02-25T14:03:59Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/1163
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Sc. (Nutrition))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2005.
dc.description.abstractMotivation: The detrimental effects of obesity and insulin resistance in Caucasians and African-Americans have been the focus of many recent publications, and the association between PAI-1act and markers of the metabolic syndrome is well established but data on African subjects are still lacking. Objectives: To investigate possible differences between the association of PAI-1act with markers of the metabolic syndrome in Caucasian and African women. Methods We used cross-sectional data from the POWIRS I and II studies, involving 95 African and 114 Caucasian women respectively in the Potchefstroom district of the North West Province, South Africa. Results: Mean plasma PAI-1act was significantly higher in the Caucasian than in the African subjects (p < 0.001). Markers for the metabolic syndrome explained 60% of the variance of PAI-1act in the Caucasian group, but only 2.8% of the variance of PAI-1act in the African group. Waist circumference emerged as the strongest independent predictor of PAI-1act in the Caucasian (34%) as well as the African subjects (11%). Conclusion: This study showed clear differences in PAI-1act between African and Caucasian subjects, along with differences in the association of PAI-1act with markers of the metabolic syndrome. Apparent genetic differences between the two groups (especially the role of the 4G/5G genotype) may have an important influence on PAI-1act The role of PAI-1act in the metabolic syndrome may differ between Caucasians and Africans.
dc.publisherNorth-West University
dc.subjectPAI-1en
dc.subjectMetabolic syndromeen
dc.subjectObesityen
dc.subjectInsulin resistanceen
dc.titleComparison of the association of PAI-1 act with the metabolic syndrome markers in caucasian and black South African womenen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.thesistypeMasters


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