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Job insecurity, general health and resilience of teachers in the Sedibeng West District / by Puleng Christinah Mofokeng.

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dc.contributor.author Mofokeng, Puleng Christinah
dc.date.accessioned 2009-05-22T10:05:41Z
dc.date.available 2009-05-22T10:05:41Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10394/1856
dc.description Thesis (M.A. (Industrial Psychology))--North-West University, Vaal Triangle Campus, 2008. en
dc.description.abstract The world of work in South Africa has and is still changing. These changes include the introduction of the Employment Equity Act, Broad Based Black Economic Empowerment and the advancement in technologies. In addition, South Africa is now a globalised country and this means that it is faced with the challenge of keeping up with the trends of doing business and working in line with other globalised countries. The effect of tllis in the teaching environment may be linked to the high demands and changes placed on teachers. They have to increase the standard of education and change old ways of teaching. With these rapid changes and demands teachers may feel that they are not competent enough and have limited resources to achieve what it is expected of them by the Government. Consequently, this causes a feeling of job insecurity amongst teachers, especially when they feel that what the government is demanding of them do not compare to the resources available. Job insecurity has an influence on the individual as well as the organisation. On the individual's side, it results in reduced levels of psychological well-being characterised by incidents such as anxiety, social dysfunction, irritation and strain-related psychosomatic complaints. With regard to the organisation, some individuals psychologically withdraw from the job or the whole organisation when they experience a feeling of job insecurity. In addition, there is an increase in absenteeism. Although a feeling of job insecurity is a reality in thc South African world of work, only limited numbers of programmes are implemented to address the problem. To overcome a feeling of job insecurity, employees need to be resilient. When faced with challenges, stressful events and changes individuals cope and adapt in varied ways and show varying degrees of resilience. Furthermore, there is a lack of research on the relationship between job insecurity, general health and resilience of teachers in South Africa. The objective of this study was to determine whether a relationship exist between job insecurity, general health and resilience. The cross-sectional research design was used with a survey technique to collect data from an available random sample of teachers in the Sedibeng West District. The measuring battery consisted of four questionnaires namely; a Job Insecurity Questionnaire (JIQ), 28-item version of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), Resilience Scale (RS) and a Biographical Questionnaire. A positive correlation was obtained between job insecurity and psychological distress, suggesting that increased levels of job insecurity are associated with increased levels of psychological distress. Negative correlations were found between job insecurity and resilience as well as resilience and general health, suggesting that individuals who have high levels of resilience also have low levels on job insecurity and psychological distress respectively. A statistically significant difference was found on job insecurity with regard to cultural groups and the employment contract of teachers. Conclusions were drawn from the findings and recommendations were made for the Department of Education and future research. en
dc.description.abstract The world of work in South Africa has and is still changing. These changes include the introduction of the Employment Equity Act, Broad Based Black Economic Empowerment and the advancement in technologies. In addition, South Africa is now a globalised country and this means that it is faced with the challenge of keeping up with the trends of doing business and working in line with other globalised countries. The effect of this in the teaching environment may be linked to the high demands and changes placed on teachers. They have to increase the standard of education and change old ways of teaching. With these rapid changes and demands teachers may feel that they are not competent enough and have limited resources to achieve what it is expected of them by the Government. Consequently, this causes a feeling of job insecurity amongst teachers, especially when they feel that what the government is demanding of them do not compare to the resources available. Job insecurity has an influence on the individual as well as the organisation. On the individual's side, it results in reduced levels of psychological well-being characterised by incidents such as anxiety, social dysfunction, irritation and strain-related psychosomatic complaints. With regard to the organisation, some individuals psychologically withdraw from the job or the whole organisation when they experience a feeling of job insecurity. In addition, there is an increase in absenteeism. Although a feeling of job insecurity is a reality in the South African world of work, only limited numbers of programmes are implemented to address the problem. To overcome a feeling of job insecurity, employees need to be resilient. When faced with challenges, stressful events and changes individuals cope and adapt in varied ways and show varying degrees of resilience. Furthermore, there is a lack of research on the relationship between job insecurity, general health and resilience of teachers in South Africa. The objective of this study was to determine whether a relationship exist between job insecurity, general health and resilience. The cross-sectional research design was used with a survey technique to collect data from an available random sample of teachers in the Sedibeng West District. The measuring battery consisted of four questionnaires namely; a Job Insecurity Questionnaire (JIQ), 28-item version of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), Resilience Scale (RS) and a Biographical Questionnaire. A positive correlation was obtained between job insecurity and psychological distress, suggesting that increased levels of job insecurity are associated with increased levels of psychological distress. Negative correlations were found between job insecurity and resilience as well as resilience and general health, suggesting that individuals who have high levels of resilience also have low levels on job insecurity and psychological distress respectively. A statistically significant difference was found on job insecurity with regard to cultural groups and the employment contract of teachers. Conclusions were drawn from the findings and recommendations were made for the Department of Education and future research.
dc.publisher North-West University en_US
dc.subject Job insecurity en
dc.subject General health en
dc.subject Psychological well-being en
dc.subject Resilience en
dc.subject Teachers en
dc.title Job insecurity, general health and resilience of teachers in the Sedibeng West District / by Puleng Christinah Mofokeng. en
dc.type Thesis en
dc.description.thesistype Masters


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