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dc.contributor.advisorVan Niekerk, H M
dc.contributor.authorDu Preez, Hannelie
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-05T06:44:21Z
dc.date.available2017-04-05T06:44:21Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/21059
dc.descriptionPhD (Learner Support), North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2016.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe assumption of educationists is that the teaching of Beginning Knowledge, situated in the Life Skills subject within the Foundation Phase curriculum, is not as important as the education of Literacy and Mathematics to learners. However, scholarly work has conveyed that the acquisition and comprehension of Beginning Knowledge concepts and skills, developed through Geography, History, Natural Sciences, and Technology knowledge bases, is essential for cultivating scientific literate citizens for a democratic society and essential knowledge and skills for an ever-changing future. The purpose of this historical research inquiry was to explicate how the subject Beginning Knowledge has developed historically, by means of critically analysing international and national views on Education, Society and Technology over a period of six hundred and fifteen years. These three accounts were interpreted, by using a hybrid theoretical framework (Cultural-Historical Activity Theory, Ecological Systems Theory, and Media Theory), to explain the complex nature and development of Beginning Knowledge education in the Foundation Phase in South Africa. The significance of the inquiry is not only in the unique methodological and theoretical framework utilised to investigate the phenomenon, but also the first ever intellectual mapping of this subject within a South African context. It also has the potential for serving as an impetus for future debates and research, especially in South Africa, on the importance of teaching Beginning Knowledge in the Foundation Phase to cater for the necessities of future societies. This historical research inquiry also announces the compelling truth that Foundation Phase teachers should be trained adequately, with sophisticated knowledge about Beginning Knowledge and how to teach the subject optimally to our future generation of Foundation Phase learners. In the words of Vygotsky in Doyla: “Education must be orientated not towards the yesterday of child development but towards its tomorrow” (2010, p. 10).en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNorth-West University (South Africa) , Potchefstroom Campusen_US
dc.subjectBeginning knowledgeen_US
dc.subjectFoundation phaseen_US
dc.subjectLife skillsen_US
dc.subjectHybrid Cultural-Historical Activity Theoryen_US
dc.subjectHistorical analysisen_US
dc.subjectSciences educationen_US
dc.subjectSouth Africaen_US
dc.subjectAanvangskennisen_US
dc.subjectGrondslagfaseen_US
dc.subjectHibridiese Kultureel-Historiese Aktiwiteitsteorieen_US
dc.subjectHistoriese analiseen_US
dc.subjectLewensvaardighedeen_US
dc.subjectWetenskapsleeren_US
dc.subjectSuid-Afrikaen_US
dc.titleA historical subject-didactical genetic analysis of Life Skills education in early childhooden_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.thesistypeDoctoralen_US


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