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dc.contributor.advisorDe Klerk, D., Prof
dc.contributor.advisorBotha, C.J., Prof
dc.contributor.authorWillemse, V.J.
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-13T13:26:38Z
dc.date.available2018-09-13T13:26:38Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-3996-9244
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/31095
dc.descriptionMBA, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campusen_US
dc.description.abstractInvestors continuously seek opportunities to obtain major returns when participating in the market. This is done by optimising trading strategies and effectively diversifying investment portfolios. Comprehensive market information is essential for investors to achieve this. One way of diversifying portfolios and improving trading strategies is to invest in metal commodities. Metal commodities are generally highly volatile. This presents opportunities for investors to place themselves in a position to achieve major returns in the commodity market. However, the Efficient Market Hypothesis (EMH) asserts that all information is already incorporated in market prices. Based on the EMH, no investor should be able to achieve abnormal returns when participating in the market. There has been great controversy regarding the EMH over the last few decades. Research has shown that the theory has been both supported and disputed. This study examined the weak-form of the EMH on certain commodity price movements. The study was focused on three metal commodities over a sample period from January 2011 to June 2017. These commodities included gold, iron ore and platinum. Statistical methods such as the autocorrelations test, runs test and unit roots test were used to determine whether the price movements of these commodities were weak-form efficient. The results from all the methods used indicated that the price movement of these commodities is not weak-form efficient over the sample period. However, the autocorrelations test on gold price movement indicated an increase in weak-form efficiency over time. Furthermore, the study concluded that there are no significant differences in the level of weak-form efficiency between precious metals and non-precious metals.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNorth-West Universityen_US
dc.subjectEfficient market hypothesisen_US
dc.subjectMarket efficiencyen_US
dc.subjectWeak-form efficiencyen_US
dc.subjectCommoditiesen_US
dc.subjectRuns testen_US
dc.subjectAutocorrelations testen_US
dc.subjectUnit roots testen_US
dc.titleExamining the weak form of the efficient market hypothesis in certain commodity price movementsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.thesistypeMastersen_US
dc.contributor.researchID10201262 - Botha, Christoffel Jacobus


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