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dc.contributor.authorMarais, Carinen_US
dc.contributor.authorMostert, Karinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGeurts, Sabine
dc.contributor.authorTaris, Toon
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-04T15:33:32Z
dc.date.available2010-08-04T15:33:32Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationMarais, C. et al. 2009. The psychometric properties of a translated version of the Survey Work-Home Interaction - Nijmegen (SWING) instrument. South African Journal of Psychology, 39(2):202-219 [https://journals.co.za/content/sapsyc/39/2/EJC98534]en_US
dc.identifier.issn0081-2463
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/3240
dc.identifier.urihttps://journals.co.za/content/sapsyc/39/2/EJC98534
dc.description.abstractIn this study we examined (1) the construct validity, construct equivalence, and reliability of two translations of the Survey Work-Home Interaction — Nijmegen (SWING); (2) the prevalence of work-home interaction; and (3) validity evidence based on relations with theoretically relevant external variables (i.e. job characteristics and indicators of well-being). The SWING questionnaire and a biographical questionnaire were translated into Afrikaans and Setswana and were administered, together with the original English version, among a cross-sectional sample of 685 members of the South African Police Service in North West Province. Structural equation modelling showed that a four-factor model, distinguishing between the direction (work-to-home vs. home-to-work) and the quality (positive vs. negative) of interaction, fitted the data best. The SWING was equivalent and reliable for the three language groups and relevant sub-groups. Participants reported more negative work-home interaction (WHI) than negative home-work interaction (HWI), and more positive HWI than positive WHI. Validity evidence was also provided based on the relations with external variables. In general, high levels of negative WHI were associated with job demands and a lack of job resources, while high levels of positive WHI were associated with lower demands and more job resources. Evidence was also provided for the relations between the SWING scales and four indicators of well-being (i.e. exhaustion, cynicism, professional efficacy and engagement). It is concluded that the SWING is a reliable and valid instrument to measure work-home interaction in South Africa.
dc.publisherOpenJournals Publishing
dc.titleThe psychometric properties of a translated version of the Survey Work-Home Interaction - Nijmegen (SWING) instrumenten_US
dc.contributor.researchID11320281 - Mostert, Karina


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