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dc.contributor.advisorWehrmeyer, J.E.
dc.contributor.authorAntunes, Sarita
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-22T13:32:10Z
dc.date.available2020-05-22T13:32:10Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-5364-1253
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/34685
dc.descriptionMA (Taalpraktyk) North-West University, Vanderbijlpark Campusen_US
dc.description.abstractTranslation studies can benefit from incorporating concepts from personality trait theory and personality psychology into the training of translation studies students. The possibility of different text types for different personality traits can be very useful. Part of the various traits that make a professional translator succesful is personality but this is not taken into consideration when translation students are recruited. Most translators and intepreters agree that personality plays a part with regard to work success and they also have their stereotypes about the personality traits of their colleagues (Henderson, 1987:4). Personality traits are taken into consideration when career goals en recruiting decisions are made but there is very little proof about personality traits when professional linguists are chosen or asked for advice. Research on personality traits and translation was first done by Henderson (1987) and his general hypothesis is that there are characteristic personality differences between professional translators and the general population, as well as translators and interpreters (Henderson, 1987:14). Lehka-Paul and Whyatt (2016) and Hubscher-Davidson (2009) also did research in this field. Reiss (2004) and Barboni (1999) did no empirical studies about the influence of personality traits in translation studies but they made good assumptions like technical translators are more objective. Henderson (1987) did an empirical study where he used the 16 PF as a psychometric test in order to identify the personality traits of translators. Lehka-Paul and Whyatt (2016) used MBTI and HEXACO, and Hubscher-Davidson (2009) used MBTI. The purpose of this study is to fill the gap about personality profiles of translators by using the standardised online BFI psychometric test to generate a personality profile of translators. Secondly this study analyses the translation product according to Newmark’s semantic and communicative model and Reiss’s three text types. Thirdly the translation choices are investigated according to Baker’s translation strategies. This study found that creativity is higher in younger translators and that there is a correlation between those who complete a lot of projects per year. Most translators choose to translate creatively when an expressive text is translated and creativity was the highest personality trait. Another finding is that translators also tend to stay close to the ST.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNorth-West University (South Africa)en_US
dc.subjectTranslator profileen_US
dc.subjectPersonality profile compositionen_US
dc.subjectBig Five personality traitsen_US
dc.subjectPersonality trait theoryen_US
dc.subjectTranslation producten_US
dc.subjectCreative translationen_US
dc.subjectLiteral translationen_US
dc.titleDie uitwerking van persoonlikheid op vertalingstrategieëen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.thesistypeMastersen_US
dc.contributor.researchID25386387 - Wehrmeyer, Jennifer Ella (Supervisor)
dc.contributor.researchID


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