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dc.contributor.advisorLubbe, W.
dc.contributor.advisorMinnie, C.S.
dc.contributor.authorNyaloko, Madimetja Jack
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-29T13:01:44Z
dc.date.available2020-06-29T13:01:44Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-2331-105
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/34965
dc.descriptionMSc (Nursing), North-West University, Potchefstroom Campusen_US
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND Despite the documented benefits of exclusive breastfeeding; as an optimal infant feeding method to achieve healthy growth and development of the baby, its implementation remains sub-optimal in South Africa with persistently low exclusive breastfeeding rates. The success of breastfeeding in public spaces depends on the perceptions of mothers and community members regarding breastfeeding in public spaces, and other factors. AIM AND OBJECTIVES This study aimed to identify the knowledge level of breastfeeding benefits and perceptions of breastfeeding in public spaces among mothers and community members in order to formulate health messages that will encourage social support and acceptance of BF in public spaces. To achieve the aim, the objectives of this study were to: Identify and describe the knowledge level of breastfeeding benefits among mothers and community members. Identify and describe the perceptions of mothers and community members regarding the BF in public spaces. Formulate health messages for mothers and community members to encourage social support and acceptance of BF in public spaces. SETTINGS This study was conducted in five clinics in the Alexandra area of Johannesburg, Gauteng Province, South Africa. METHOD Quantitative, descriptive research methodology was deployed using questionnaires as the data collection tool. The respondents represented two groups, mothers (n=96) and community members (n=96). RESULTS Most mothers (69.2%) reported that they felt comfortable to breastfeed in public spaces. However, 38.9% of the mothers reported a lack of support, feeling uncomfortable, and embarrassed. Most community members (81.2%) reported that they were comfortable when mothers breastfed their infants in public spaces. There was a theoretically significant difference regarding perceptions of the acceptability of breastfeeding in public spaces between single and married mothers (t (92) =2.70, p≤ 0.008, CI.95 0.095-0.620). The average results of perceptions of acceptability for single mothers to breastfeed in public spaces of (M=3.08, SD=0.63) were higher than that of married mothers (M2.72, SD=0.61). Altogether, the majority of mothers (69%) were comfortable to breastfeed in public spaces, and community members (84%) were supportive. CONCLUSION Altogether, the majority of mothers (69%) were comfortable to breastfeed in public spaces, and community members (84%) were supportive. Limited knowledge of breastfeeding benefits was associated with unsupportive attitudes towards breastfeeding in public spaces. Health messages that target these factors are essential to encourage support and acceptance of breastfeeding in public spaces. This could be executed through public education via posters in public spaces and during community health outreaches.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNorth-West University (South-Africa)en_US
dc.subjectBreastfeedingen_US
dc.subjectMothersen_US
dc.subjectCommunity membersen_US
dc.subjectPerceptionsen_US
dc.subjectBreastfeeding in public spacesen_US
dc.titlePerceptions of mothers and community members regarding breastfeeding in public spaces of urban Gauteng in South Africaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.thesistypeMastersen_US
dc.contributor.researchID21547173 - Lubbe, Welma (Supervisor)
dc.contributor.researchID10387323 - Minnie, Catharina Susanna (Supervisor)


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