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dc.contributor.authorAppiah, Collins Afriyie
dc.contributor.authorFrimpong, Emmanuel
dc.contributor.authorAfriyie, Edward Opoku
dc.contributor.authorHayford, Frank Ekow Atta
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-28T09:06:16Z
dc.date.available2020-08-28T09:06:16Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationAppiah, C.A. et al. 2020. Prevalence and lifestyle-associated risk factors of metabolic syndrome among commercial motor vehicle drivers in a metropolitan city in Ghana. Pan African medical journal, 36: #136. [https://doi.org/10.11604/pamj.2020.36.136.16861]en_US
dc.identifier.issn1937-8688
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/35651
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.panafrican-med-journal.com/content/article/36/136/full
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.11604/pamj.2020.36.136.16861
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: commercial motor vehicle drivers are at risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS) due to the nature of their work as they tend to go to work early, work for more hours, have irregular dietary habits and patterns, have little sleep and live sedentary lifestyle. The study sought to determine the prevalence and lifestyle-related risk factors of MetS among commercial taxi drivers around Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) campus, in the Kumasi metropolis, Ghana. Methods: a cross-sectional survey was conducted among 100 commercial taxi drivers in 3 selected taxi ranks around KNUST campus. Fasting blood lipid and fasting blood glucose levels, blood pressure and anthropometric characteristics were determined using WHO and NCEP-ATP III criteria. Lifestyle-related risk factors of MetS were assessed using a semi-structured questionnaire and dietary pattern was assessed using food frequency questionnaire. Bivariate analysis and linear correlation were used to determine the relationship between lifestyle practices and MetS. Results: the prevalence of diabetes, high blood pressure, dyslipidemia, overweight and obesity were 12%, 63%, 40%, 32% and 13% respectively. The prevalence of MetS was 5% according to NCEP-ATP III (2005) criteria. The lifestyle behaviours of the drivers were, alcohol intake, irregular dietary pattern, long working hours, lack of exercise and tiredness due to driving. Tobacco use (R = 0.405, p = 0.041) and time of supper (R = 0.931, p = 0.047) were related with MetS among the participants. Conclusion: though prevalence of MetS (5%) was low among the drivers, the need for intervention to promote positive lifestyle change and curb the high prevalence of overweight/obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and dyslipidemia is necessary to improve the health of the drivers and the safety of passengersen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPAMJen_US
dc.titlePrevalence and lifestyle-associated risk factors of metabolic syndrome among commercial motor vehicle drivers in a metropolitan city in Ghanaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.researchID39585425 - Frimpong, Emmanuel K.


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