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dc.contributor.authorTurton, A
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-19T09:57:46Z
dc.date.available2011-01-19T09:57:46Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationTURTON, A. 2009. The role of science in deepening democracy: the case for water in post-Apartheid South Africa. TD: The Journal for Transdisciplinary Research in Southern Africa, 5(1):9-28, Jul. [http://dspace.nwu.ac.za/handle/10394/3605]en
dc.identifier.issn1817-4434
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/3959
dc.description.abstractSouth Africa is a water constrained country with a complex history of resource capture and human rights abuses. Science, as practiced by the national science councils, could play a significant role in deepening our democracy. This paper explores two possible paradigms - one where science is divorced from the national constitution, and the other where our science is embedded in the national constitution. The paper argues that the latter approach would make our national science more relevant, but of necessity would embroil it in issues of historic legacy and therefore become “messy”.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectHeroic engineering phaseen
dc.subjectCholeraen
dc.subjectCouncil for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR)en
dc.subjectWater quality drivers: radiologicaen
dc.subjectChemical and biologicalen
dc.subjectNational Nuclear Regulator (NNR)en
dc.subjectTooth Fairy Projecten
dc.subjectAcid Mine Drainage (AMD)en
dc.subjectHeavy metalsen
dc.subjectUraniumen
dc.subjectEutrophicationen
dc.subjectCyanobacteriaen
dc.subjectXenophobiaen
dc.titleThe role of science in deepening democracy: the case for water in post-Apartheid South Africaen
dc.typeArticleen


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