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Urinary 1,4–dihydroxynonene mercapturic acid (DHN–MA) and 8–hydroxy–2'–deoxyguanosine (8–OHdG) as markers of oxidative damage : the SABPA study / by Leandrie Steenkamp

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dc.contributor.author Steenkamp, Leandrie en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-08-30T09:20:07Z
dc.date.available 2011-08-30T09:20:07Z
dc.date.issued 2010 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10394/4559
dc.description Thesis (M.Sc. (Biochemistry))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2011.
dc.description.abstract The human body has evolved certain defence mechanisms to cope with the high occurrence of free radicals. These radicals are obtained endogenously from the mitochondria, peroxisomes, the cytochrome P450 (CYP 450) system and neutrophils, or exogenously from the environment. Lack of antioxidants and/or increased production of free radicals will result in oxidative stress, which has been implicated in certain human diseases such as hypertension, inflammation, ageing, autoimmunity, atherosclerosis, Parkinson?s disease, cancer and diabetes. Although the initial aim was to standardise a single assay to quantify both 8–OHdG and DHN–MA, this could not be achieved in this study due to the vast difference in the chemical properties of these two metabolites. Following the decision to use two separate assays for the quantification of the mentioned biomarkers, the 8–OHdG assay was standardised and validated. The intrabatch variation of the assay was 4.18% and the interbatch variation was 17.37%. Unfortunately, the DHN–MA assay could not be standardised within the time frame of this study due to experimental difficulties. Therefore, only urinary 8–OHdG and serum ROS levels were quantified. Urinary 8–OHdG levels were measured in 409 participants (209 Caucasians, 101 males and 108 females and 200 Africans, 100 males and 100 females) from the SABPA study. After removal of outliers from the data matrix, the effect of gender and ethnicity was investigated on the measured urinary 8–OHdG levels. No significant difference in the urinary 8–OHdG levels between Caucasian males (n=87) and females (n=96) were observed (p = 0.68). A similar observation was made for the African males (n=86) and females (n=84), where no significant difference in 8–OHdG levels was detected (p = 0.053). Thus, from the results obtained in this study, it seems that urinary 8–OHdG levels are not influenced by gender. However, 8–OHdG levels were dramatically influenced by ethnicity. Caucasian males (n=87) excreted 70% higher amounts of 8–OHdG compared to African males (n=86) (p < 0.001). Caucasian females (n=96) also excreted larger urinary 8–OHdG amounts (42%) compared to African females (n=84) (p < 0.001). Therefore, it seems that urinary 8–OHdG levels are dramatically influenced by ethnicity. Finally, urinary 8–OHdG levels were compared to serum ROS levels, but no significant correlation between the measured metabolites was observed (r = –0.045). Hence, urinary 8–OHdG and serum ROS levels are not related in these subjects. Even though the initial aim of this study was to standardise an analytical method to quantify both urinary 8–OHdG and DHN–MA, this could not be achieved due to time constraints. vi The human body has evolved certain defence mechanisms to cope with the high occurrence of free radicals. These radicals are obtained endogenously from the mitochondria, peroxisomes, the cytochrome P450 (CYP 450) system and neutrophils, or exogenously from the environment. Lack of antioxidants and/or increased production of free radicals will result in oxidative stress, which has been implicated in certain human diseases such as hypertension, inflammation, ageing, autoimmunity, atherosclerosis, Parkinson?s disease, cancer and diabetes. Although the initial aim was to standardise a single assay to quantify both 8–OHdG and DHN–MA, this could not be achieved in this study due to the vast difference in the chemical properties of these two metabolites. Following the decision to use two separate assays for the quantification of the mentioned biomarkers, the 8–OHdG assay was standardised and validated. The intrabatch variation of the assay was 4.18% and the interbatch variation was 17.37%. Unfortunately, the DHN–MA assay could not be standardised within the time frame of this study due to experimental difficulties. Therefore, only urinary 8–OHdG and serum ROS levels were quantified. Urinary 8–OHdG levels were measured in 409 participants (209 Caucasians, 101 males and 108 females and 200 Africans, 100 males and 100 females) from the SABPA study. After removal of outliers from the data matrix, the effect of gender and ethnicity was investigated on the measured urinary 8–OHdG levels. No significant difference in the urinary 8–OHdG levels between Caucasian males (n=87) and females (n=96) were observed (p = 0.68). A similar observation was made for the African males (n=86) and females (n=84), where no significant difference in 8–OHdG levels was detected (p = 0.053). Thus, from the results obtained in this study, it seems that urinary 8–OHdG levels are not influenced by gender. However, 8–OHdG levels were dramatically influenced by ethnicity. Caucasian males (n=87) excreted 70% higher amounts of 8–OHdG compared to African males (n=86) (p < 0.001). Caucasian females (n=96) also excreted larger urinary 8–OHdG amounts (42%) compared to African females (n=84) (p < 0.001). Therefore, it seems that urinary 8–OHdG levels are dramatically influenced by ethnicity. Finally, urinary 8–OHdG levels were compared to serum ROS levels, but no significant correlation between the measured metabolites was observed (r = –0.045). Hence, urinary 8–OHdG and serum ROS levels are not related in these subjects. Even though the initial aim of this study was to standardise an analytical method to quantify both urinary 8–OHdG and DHN–MA, this could not be achieved due to time constraints. However, an LC–MS/MS analytical assay was standardised and validated for the quantification of urinary 8–OHdG. The method proved reliable for the quantification of 8–OHdG from urine samples and can thus be used for further studies on oxidative DNA damage. en_US
dc.publisher North-West University
dc.subject Lipid peroxidation en_US
dc.subject DNA damage en_US
dc.subject 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine en_US
dc.subject 1,4-dihydroxynonene mercapturic acid en_US
dc.subject Tandem mass spectrometry en_US
dc.subject Lipied peroksidasie en_US
dc.subject DNS skade en_US
dc.subject 8-hidroksie-2'-deoksieguanosien en_US
dc.subject 1,4 dihidroksienonene merkaptuursuur en_US
dc.subject Tandem massa spektrometrie en_US
dc.title Urinary 1,4–dihydroxynonene mercapturic acid (DHN–MA) and 8–hydroxy–2'–deoxyguanosine (8–OHdG) as markers of oxidative damage : the SABPA study / by Leandrie Steenkamp en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.thesistype Masters en_US


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