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The Status and Role of Legislation In South Africa as a Constitutional Democracy : Some Exploratory Observations

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dc.contributor.author Du Plessis, L en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-09-06T12:40:46Z
dc.date.available 2011-09-06T12:40:46Z
dc.date.issued 2011 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1727-3781 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10394/4680
dc.description.abstract This note explores the proposition that in the face of probably one of the most unequivocal forms of constitutional review in a modern day state, legislation in South Africa has since 27 April 1994 grown in status (and stature) nonetheless, and has assumed an unprecedented role in our constitutional democracy. First, it is shown how constitutional review with the necessary judicial self–restraint has instilled respect for legislation in the context of and with reference to the separation of powers. Second, it is shown that and how statutes have become (subsidiary) allies to the Constitution and have been standing the realisation of constitutional values in good stead. Finally, it is argued that the constitutional requirement of popular participation in legislative deliberation has also added to the esteem for legislation in our constitutional democracy. en_US
dc.title The Status and Role of Legislation In South Africa as a Constitutional Democracy : Some Exploratory Observations en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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