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Negative acculturation context variables as predictors of acculturation outcomes in a mine in the North–West Province / Anneke Burckard

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dc.contributor.author Burckard, Anneke en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-09-08T06:57:03Z
dc.date.available 2011-09-08T06:57:03Z
dc.date.issued 2009 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10394/4734
dc.description Thesis (M.A. (Human Resource Management))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2010.
dc.description.abstract This research project examines the acculturation process in order to predict the perceived work success and health (psychological and physical) of mineworkers in a mine in the North–West Province.1 Work success can also be described as that which is achieved when an employee enjoys his career for reasons of psychological experience of success and personal growth and development within both his/her current occupation and working environment. Health is defined as a condition of complete physical, mental and social well–being and not merely the absence of disease or frailty. Health is therefore about completeness, contentment and well–being at a physical, cultural, psychosocial, economic and spiritual level. Employees’ success and health is evaluated from an acculturation perspective, and therefore considered a result of the acculturation process. This proposition was explored by investigating the relationship between the acculturation context and individual intervening factors, mapped into variables, and acculturation outcomes (work success and health). A convenient sample of participants from the mine examined was taken (n = 288). English questionnaires using a cross–sectional survey design were used to gather the data. Modified measuring instruments and others developed for the project, which follow a five–point Likert format (‘strongly agree’ to ‘strongly disagree’) were used to investigate the mainstream domain (perceived mainstream segregation demands, perceived pressure to conform to management ideologies and practices, perceived racism at work, perceived discrimination at work, and relationships with mainstream members at work), an individual intervening factor (individual separation acculturation strategy practices), the ethnocultural domain (perceived pressure to conform to own culture, ethnic separation demands at work, and relationships with co–ethnics at work), psychological acculturation outcomes (health), and sociocultural acculturation outcomes (work success). The data was captured in a spreadsheet, controlled for errors, and statistically analysed using regression in SPSS. Descriptive statistics, Cronbach alpha coefficients, and Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients were inspected, and effect sizes were used to determine the findings’ practical significance. The results did indicate practical and statistically significant relationships exist between acculturation context, individual and acculturation outcomes variables. Perceived pressure to conform to management ideologies and practices, perceived racism at work, perceived discrimination at work, and relationships with co–ethnics at work proved to be statistically significant predictors of meeting deadlines at work. Perceived pressure to conform to management ideologies and practices, perceived racism at work, perceived discrimination at work, and relationships with co–ethnics at work was statistically significant predictors of reputation and respect at work. Perceived mainstream segregation demands, perceived pressure to conform to management ideologies and practices, perceived racism at work, and relationships with mainstream members at work were statistically significant predictors of training and development opportunities at work. Individual separation acculturation strategy practices and ethnic separation demands at work were statistically significant predictors of psychological health. Perceived racism at work and ethnic separation demands at work proved to be statistically significant predictors of physical health. These findings demonstrate that success and health can be viewed from an acculturation perspective, and that the acculturation context and individual intervening factors, can be used to predict psychological and sociocultural acculturation outcomes. en_US
dc.publisher North-West University
dc.subject Segregation en_US
dc.subject Pressure to conform en_US
dc.subject Racism en_US
dc.subject Discrimination en_US
dc.subject Individual separation strategy en_US
dc.subject Psychological and sociocultural adaptation en_US
dc.subject Physical ill health en_US
dc.subject Psychological ill health and work success en_US
dc.subject Segregasie en_US
dc.subject Druk om te konformeer en_US
dc.subject Rassisme en_US
dc.subject Diskriminasie en_US
dc.subject Individuele afsondering akkulturasie strategie en_US
dc.subject Psigologiese en sosiokulturele aanpassing en_US
dc.subject Fisiese ongesondheid en_US
dc.subject Psigologiese ongesondheid en werk sukses en_US
dc.title Negative acculturation context variables as predictors of acculturation outcomes in a mine in the North–West Province / Anneke Burckard en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.thesistype Masters en_US


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    This collection contains the original digitized versions of research conducted at the North-West University (Potchefstroom Campus)

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