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Madresahs and Moravians. Muslim educational institutions in the Cape Colony, 1792 to 1910.

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dc.contributor.author Shell, Robert
dc.date.accessioned 2012-01-23T07:19:07Z
dc.date.available 2012-01-23T07:19:07Z
dc.date.issued 2006
dc.identifier.citation Shell, R. 2006. Madresahs and Moravians. Muslim educational institutions in the Cape Colony, 1792 to 1910. New Contree : A journal of Historical and Human Sciences for Southern Africa. 51:101-113, May. [http://dspace.nwu.ac.za/handle/10394/4969] en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0379-9867
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10394/5305
dc.description.abstract The vigorous revival of Christian missionary activity after 1792 with the return of the Moravians and the arrival of the London Missionary Society had little effect on Cape Town Muslims. By 1793 the Dorp Street school (madrasah) was established. By then, many of the males slaves and the free black population in Cape Town were securely Muslim. The success of the Cape Town Muslim clerisy owed much to the schools the imams established in all the colonial ports and some inland towns during the nineteenth century. In academic discussions of the "first" or "oldest" school in the country only European schools are mentioned. There is no reason for this omission. The author reviews the rise of the Cape madrasahs. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher School for Basic Sciences, Vaal Triangle Campus, North-West University en_US
dc.title Madresahs and Moravians. Muslim educational institutions in the Cape Colony, 1792 to 1910. en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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