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dc.contributor.authorDranitsaris, Georgeen_US
dc.contributor.authorLubbe, Martie S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTruter, Ilseen_US
dc.contributor.authorCottrell, Wayneen_US
dc.contributor.authorSpirovski, Biljanaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-29T09:49:45Z
dc.date.available2012-02-29T09:49:45Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationDranitsaris, G. et al. 2010. The application of pharmacoeconomic modelling to estimate a value-based price for new cancer drugs . Journal of evaluation in clinical practice, 18(2): 343-351. [https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2753.2010.01565.x]en_US
dc.identifier.issn1356-1294en_US
dc.identifier.issn1365-2753 (Online)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/5950
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2753.2010.01565.x
dc.identifier.urihttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1365-2753.2010.01565.x
dc.description.abstractRationale, aims and objectives  Value‐based pricing has recently been discussed by international bodies as a means to estimate a drug price that is linked to the benefits it offers patients and society. The World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended using three times a country's per capita gross domestic product (GDP) as the threshold for economic value. Using the WHO criteria, pharmacoeconomic modelling was used to illustrate the application of value‐based price towards bevacizumab, a relatively new drug that provides a 1.4‐month survival benefit to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Methods  A decision model was developed to simulate outcomes in mCRC patients receiving chemotherapy ± bevacizumab. Clinical data were obtained from randomized trials and costs from Canadian cancer centres. Utility estimates were determined by interviewing 24 oncology nurses and pharmacists. A price per dose of bevacizumab was then estimated using a target threshold of $CAD117 000 per quality adjusted life year gained, which is three times the Canadian per capita GDP. Results  For a 1.4‐month survival benefit, a price of $CAD830 per dose would be considered cost‐effective from the Canadian public health care perspective. If the drug were able to improve patient quality of life or survival from 1.4 to 3 months, the drug price could increase to $CAD1560 and $CAD2180 and still be considered cost‐effective. Discussion  The use of the WHO criteria for estimating a value‐based price is feasible, but a balance between what patients/governments can afford to pay and the commercial viability of the product in the reference country would be required
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.subjectChemotherapy
dc.subjectColorectal cancer
dc.subjectCost analysis
dc.subjectDrug pricing
dc.subjectValue
dc.titleThe application of pharmacoeconomic modelling to estimate a value-based price for new cancer drugs en_US
dc.contributor.researchID10069712 - Lubbe, Martha Susanna


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