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Freshlyground and the possibilities of new identities in post-apartheid South Africa

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dc.contributor.author Balfour, R J
dc.date.accessioned 2012-08-14T12:37:29Z
dc.date.available 2012-08-14T12:37:29Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.citation Balfour, R.J. 2012. Freshlyground and the possibilities of new identities in post-apartheid South Africa. TD: The Journal for Transdisciplinary Research in Southern Africa, 8(1):95-120, Jul. [http://dspace.nwu.ac.za/handle/10394/3605] en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1817-4434
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10394/6896
dc.description.abstract Popular music and indeed popular art forms struggle for critical attention in the academy (Larkin, 1992). Relegated to a focus on performance, or to peripheral sub-disciplines such as cultural studies, the study of popular art forms is risky terrain in higher education (Wicke, 1990). Instead, and particularly within the humanities, it has been claimed that the study of canonised art forms (Viljoen & Van Der Merwe, 2004) may enable the student to analyse a range of texts with equal skill and superior insight. This paper deals with both the popular and the interdisciplinary in relation to a theorisation of the lyrics of popular South African contemporary music group Freshlyground and the possibilities for a post-Apartheid identity explored in these lyrics through the theoretical lenses of New Historicism and Cosmopolitanism. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher North-West University en_US
dc.title Freshlyground and the possibilities of new identities in post-apartheid South Africa en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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