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dc.contributor.advisorLinde, H.M.
dc.contributor.authorUys, Mariéen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-20T13:23:19Z
dc.date.available2012-08-20T13:23:19Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/6947
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A. (Industrial Sociology))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2011.
dc.description.abstractThe primary objective of this study was to establish what factors currently influence trade unions as organisations in South Africa and the European Union and then to compare these factors. To conduct this study a pure literature examination was done. Firstly the levels of trade unionism were established and thereafter the factors contributing to the levels of trade unionism were identified. The difference between a developing country and already developed countries was explained before comparisons were made between South Africa and the European Union. Common factors that influence trade unions as organisations in both the European Union and South Africa include unemployment levels and job insecurity, changes in the employment relationship, work relationships outside the traditional employment relationship and finally the reasons why people join trade unions. Lastly, an interesting finding that emerged was that certain factors influencing trade unions as organisations are unique to specific countries. The primary objective of this study was to establish what the viewpoints of trade union leaders are regarding the future of trade unions as organisations in South Africa. To conduct this study an empirical study was done. A purposive, voluntary non-probability sample (N=10) was taken of trade union officials in managerial positions of registered trade unions in South Africa. The data collection method used in this study was semi-structured interviews. Data analysis was done through structural coding. Results obtained were organised in two phases. The first phase focused on the factors that have an influence on trade unions as organisations, as identified by trade union leaders. Literature highlights specific factors as having an influence on trade unions as organisations. Phase 2 focused on the perceptions of trade union leaders of these specific factors. These findings were then discussed jointly.
dc.publisherNorth-West University
dc.titleFactors influencing the future existence of trade unions in South Africaen
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.thesistypeMastersen_US


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    This collection contains the original digitized versions of research conducted at the North-West University (Potchefstroom Campus)

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