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dc.contributor.authorPillay, Suren
dc.contributor.author10127100 - Buys, Pieter Willem
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-09T07:44:33Z
dc.date.available2015-07-09T07:44:33Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationPillay, S. & Buys, P.M. 2013. Climate change: a comparison of market–based instruments from a South African perspective. International business and economics research journal. 12(4):457-468. [http://www.cluteinstitute.com/journals/international-business-economics-research-journal-iber/]en_US
dc.identifier.issn1535-0754
dc.identifier.issn2157-9393 (Online)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/14002
dc.description.abstractThis article aims to consider the relevancy of (i) cap-and-trade schemes and (ii) carbon tax schemes in a developing economy context. Even though both schemes have a common goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, they operate very differently, each with their own set of advantages and disadvantages. Sustainable developments comprise various elements categorised in three primary dimensions – environmental, economic and social. The objective of reducing greenhouse gases via the implementation of carbon tax or cap-and-trade schemes primarily addresses the environmental dimension of sustainable development. Notwithstanding the aforementioned, the impact of both schemes on the economically sustainable development, including industry competitiveness and growth, still has to be determined. In South Africa, the National Treasury made a decision to implement carbon tax as opposed to cap-and-trade schemes. In this article, the reasoning behind their decision in favour of carbon tax in the South African context is critically considered, firstly by evaluating the key characteristics between capandtrade and carbon tax schemes and secondly by considering the effectiveness hereof in the global context. It was found primary reason behind the favourable consideration of carbon tax was the fact the implementation thereof would be ‘simpler’ using the existing taxation systems, whereas cap-and-trade would require the implementation of sophisticated mechanisms that may not provide the optimum benefit in a developing economy context.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://www.cluteinstitute.com/journals/international-business-economics-research-journal-iber/
dc.description.urihttp://www.cluteinstitute.com/ojs/index.php/IBER/article/view/7744
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherClute Instituteen_US
dc.subjectcarbon taxationen_US
dc.subjectcap-and-trade schemeen_US
dc.subjectClimate changeen_US
dc.subjectgreenhouse gas emissionsen_US
dc.subjectsustainable developmenten_US
dc.titleClimate change: a comparison of market–based instruments from a South African perspectiveen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.researchID10127100 - Buys, Pieter Willem


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