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dc.contributor.authorVan Staden, Hanlie
dc.contributor.authorVan der Merwe, Daleen
dc.contributor.authorVan Aardt, Annette
dc.contributor.authorEllis, Susanna
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-23T10:15:44Z
dc.date.available2017-03-23T10:15:44Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationVan Staden, H. et al. 2017. Low-literate consumers' use of clothing labels amidst personal and product related challenges. International journal of consumer studies, 41(1): 79-86. [http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1470-6431]en_US
dc.identifier.issn1470-6423
dc.identifier.issn1470-6431 (Online)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/20909
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijcs.12316
dc.identifier.urihttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ijcs.12316/full
dc.description.abstractLow-literate consumers experience various challenges in the marketplace. This quantitative study focused on low-literate female consumers' use of clothing labels amidst personal and product-related challenges in the marketplace. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used among black African female consumers (n = 450) with literacy levels ranging from Grades 5 to 8 (on average, 11–14 years old), residing in the Emfuleni Local Municipality area, Gauteng, South Africa. Personal challenges experienced involved reading and numeracy skills, as well as concrete and pictographic thinking. Although respondents indicated that they read and understand clothing labels, results revealed problems experienced when attempting to use the information provided. Their numeracy skills were average and related abstract thinking skills were fair. Product-related challenges were related to the format of labels, care-label knowledge and evaluation of clothing quality. Respondents' preference for symbolic and graphic presentation of size format provided evidence of pictographic thinking. Care label understanding was poor, and clothing products were evaluated concretely. Some of the older respondents were inclined to follow the peripheral route of elaboration when reading clothing-label information. We conclude that low-literate consumers' use of clothing label information can improve if provided in a format that they can read and understanden_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.subjectClothing labelsen_US
dc.subjectConsumer behaviouren_US
dc.subjectConsumer challengesen_US
dc.subjectCoping strategiesen_US
dc.subjectLow-literate consumersen_US
dc.titleLow-literate consumers' use of clothing labels amidst personal and product related challengesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.researchID10188908 - Ellis, Susanna Maria
dc.contributor.researchID13250574 - Van der Merwe, Magdalena
dc.contributor.researchID10054758 - Van Aardt, Annette Marie


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