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dc.contributor.advisorPrinsloo, Barend
dc.contributor.authorStrauss, Magdalena Alberta
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-06T13:35:06Z
dc.date.available2017-04-06T13:35:06Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/21154
dc.descriptionMaster of Development and Management), North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2016en_US
dc.description.abstractIt is generally accepted that the United Nations (UN) is primarily responsible for the maintenance of international peace and security. The UN approach to maintain peace and security is based on the principle of collective security, which covers a variety of operations. It includes peacekeeping, humanitarian assistance as well as armed combat. A theoretical background on the functions of the UN highlighted the difference of opinions on whether the UN can function outside international laws and is authorized to intervene in the domestic situation of states. Due to an increase in intrastate conflict where governments pose a greater risk to human security in comparison with interstate conflict, which poses a risk to state security, the need for the “responsibility to protect” principle developed. In the case of intrastate conflict, intervention can only take place on the invitation of the state when it is unable to protect its own people, or by the collective decision of the UNSC, when a state is unwilling to protect its population. The focus of the study against the theoretical background of the UN is to determine if the UN has fulfilled its mandate to protect women and children in the civil war of Syria from 2011 to 2015. The study provides a background of the civil war and the effects of the war on women and children. It furthermore shares the obligations of the UN to protect women and children in armed conflict and analyses the efforts of the UN to restore peace and security in Syria in an attempt to fulfil their mandate to protect the women and children of Syria. The study concludes with an evaluation of the measures of security provided by the UN to protect the women and children in the Syrian civil war. It highlights the UN’s achievements, discusses its shortcomings and proposed ideal responses to protect women and children in conflict.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNorth-West University (South Africa) , Potchefstroom Campusen_US
dc.subjectAlienationen_US
dc.subjectChild Soldiersen_US
dc.subjectCivil Waren_US
dc.subjectCollective Securityen_US
dc.subjectConflicten_US
dc.subjectHuman Rightsen_US
dc.subjectHuman Securityen_US
dc.subjectKilling and Maimingen_US
dc.subjectLost Generationen_US
dc.subjectPeace and Securityen_US
dc.subjectResolution 1325en_US
dc.subjectResponsibility to Protect (R2P)en_US
dc.subjectSexual violenceen_US
dc.subjectState Securityen_US
dc.subjectSyriaen_US
dc.subjectUnited Nations (UN)en_US
dc.subjectUnited Nations Charteren_US
dc.subjectUnited Nations General Assembly (UNGA)en_US
dc.subjectUnited Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC)en_US
dc.subjectUnited Nations Secretary-General (UNSG)en_US
dc.subjectUnited Nations Security Council (UNSC)en_US
dc.subjectUniting For Peace (UfP)en_US
dc.subjectWomen and Children’s Rightsen_US
dc.titleImplementation of the United Nations mandate to ensure adequate safety and security measures for women and children during the Syrian civil war (2011-2015)en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.thesistypeMastersen_US
dc.contributor.researchID12261319 - Prinsloo, Barend Louwrens (Supervisor)


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