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dc.contributor.authorNanima, Robert D
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-02T06:17:59Z
dc.date.available2017-05-02T06:17:59Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationNanima, R.D. 2016. The legal status of evidence obtained through human rights violations in Uganda. Potchefstroom electronic law journal (PELJ) = Potchefstroomse elektoniese regsblad (PER), 19(1):1-34 [http://www.nwu.ac.za/p-per/index.html]en_US
dc.identifier.issn1727-3781
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/21603
dc.description.abstractThe Constitution of the Republic of Uganda, 1995 is silent on the issue of dealing with evidence obtained through human rights violations. This silence dates to the earlier Constitutions of 1962, 1966 and 1967. It is only the Prohibition and Prevention of Torture Act of 2012 that renders evidence obtained through torture and cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment inadmissible. This means that evidence obtained through human rights violations other than torture and cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment is not covered by any other legislation in Uganda. The position is different in other jurisdictions such as South Africa, Kenya and Zimbabwe, which have constitutional provisions on how to deal with evidence obtained through human rights violations. The decisions that have been handed down by the Ugandan courts reflect various jurisprudential inconsistencies in dealing with this kind of evidence. This study delves into this lacuna and suggests proposals for reform.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectAdmissibilityen_US
dc.subjectEvidenceen_US
dc.subjectHuman rights violationsen_US
dc.subjectUgandaen_US
dc.titleThe legal status of evidence obtained through human rights violations in Ugandaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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