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dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Quentin
dc.contributor.authorLe Roux, Marco
dc.contributor.authorEspag, Chané
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-08T12:14:11Z
dc.date.available2017-06-08T12:14:11Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationCampbell, Q. et al. 2016. Coal product moisture control using stockpiles. (In Litvinenko, V., ed. XVIII International Coal Preparation Congress, 28 June-01 July, Saint-Petersburg, Russia. p. 747-752). [http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-40943-6_115]en_US
dc.identifier.isbn978-3-319-40942-9
dc.identifier.issn978-3-319-40943-6 (Online)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/24892
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-40943-6_115
dc.identifier.urihttps://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-40943-6_115
dc.description.abstractThe moisture content of product coal is a major factor influencing the efficiency of downstream coal utilization processes. Product stockpiles are often used as a control measure to regulate the moisture content of the coal by gravity drainage and evaporation. An understanding of the mechanisms of water migration and retention in coal stockpiles are required to optimise the management of these stockpiles. Apart from the process water carried over into the product after beneficiation, additional water due to rainfall can add to the total moisture contained in a stockpile. When the rain falls on the stockpile, it either runs off the surface or infiltrates the stockpile. The infiltrated water can evaporate from the surface (down to a certain depth), drain through a saturated toe, or remain within the stockpile to add to the total final moisture content. To study these mechanisms, laboratory scale experiments were designed. A drainage column was used to simulate the percolation of water in a stockpile, and the data verified that particle size, especially the -0.5 mm fraction, had the most significant influence on both the drainage rate and the water retained in the bed. The ratio between run-off water and infiltration water during rainstorms were also quantified, and it was shown that compaction of the bed had a major influence on infiltration. Evaporation from a coal bed surface was tested by measuring the mass loss from coal beds exposed to the atmosphere, while measuring weather conditions like temperature, relative humidity and wind speed. The average evaporation loss was about 0.8 L per m2 per dayen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.subjectCoalen_US
dc.subjectStockpileen_US
dc.subjectMoistureen_US
dc.subjectMoisture controlen_US
dc.subjectRainfallen_US
dc.subjectEvaporationen_US
dc.subjectDrainageen_US
dc.subjectPercolationen_US
dc.titleCoal product moisture control using stockpilesen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.contributor.researchID12413887 - Le Roux, Marco
dc.contributor.researchID10192247 - Campbell, Quentin Peter


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