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dc.contributor.advisorPotgieter, H M
dc.contributor.authorKakoma, Kenny Lisenge
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-04T14:03:44Z
dc.date.available2017-09-04T14:03:44Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/25488
dc.descriptionPhD (Music), North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2017en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis is a qualitative study case study to describe the meaning of Zambian indigenous songs for early childhood music education learners and teachers in the six schools in the Mongu district of the Western Province in Zambia. In early childhood education mother-tongue communication is very important for meaningful teaching and learning, developing kinaesthetic motoric growth and helping to preserve cultural heritage. English is the official language used in Zambian schools. Research showed that the standard of education is declining. There is deep concern that in the Mongu district children from 3 to 6 years old who do not understand English also do not have the opportunity to perform indigenous songs in their classrooms. Six pre-schools were visited for the field work: three in central Mongu and three on the outskirts. Personal observation and open-ended interviews with eighteen teachers (three per school), the head teacher of each school, and the district education board secretary, who is responsible for the pre-schools in Mongu district, as well as informal group and individual discussions with learners, were part of the data-collection process. This research explained the meaning of indigenous songs and included remarks of the participants, who mentioned that indigenous songs link one generation to another and that they conveyed the cultural norms and values of the society. Singing indigenous songs helps the learners with language development, improves their body movements and muscle growth. Furthermore, it creates a feeling of connectedness and friendship, makes people happy and uplifts their spirit. There were also participants who experienced indigenous songs as old-fashioned and felt that in the 21st century the focus should be on global languages such as English and on modern living styles. The technique of crystallization was used to analyse the most important themes and categories that emerged from the data. Through this coding process four themes emerged: 1) Traditions and values, 2) Teaching and learning, 3) Flourishing, and 4) A lack of appreciation. Florence Miya’s model (2007:175) of the ecosystem of the musical arts in Africa was used as a guideline for the theoretical discussion. A new model was created to implement an approach to African philosophy of education, and by extension, challenge the dominance of a colonial, Western-style education that still persists in Zambia. The stakeholders that will benefit from this research are pre-school educators, head teachers of pre-schools, educational standards officers at district and provincial levels, as well as the district education board secretaries, the provincial education officers, colleges, public and private universities, and the Ministry of Education in Zambia. It will give them direction to facilitate meaningful teaching and learningen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNorth-West University (South Africa) , Potchefstroom Campusen_US
dc.subjectMeaning of indigenous songsen_US
dc.subjectEarly childhood music education (ECME)en_US
dc.subjectIndigenous songsen_US
dc.subjectMovementen_US
dc.subjectIndigenous languagesen_US
dc.subjectEarly childhood educatorsen_US
dc.subjectMongu districten_US
dc.subjectWestern Province of Zambiaen_US
dc.titleThe meaning of Zambian indigenous songs for early childhood teachers and learnersen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.thesistypeDoctoralen_US


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