Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBell, Liam
dc.contributor.authorVorster, Barend C.
dc.contributor.authorCalder, Bridget
dc.contributor.authorHiller, Reinhard
dc.contributor.authorKlein, Ashwil
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-09T13:08:46Z
dc.date.available2018-05-09T13:08:46Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationBell, L. et al. 2018. Challenges and opportunities for biological mass spectrometry core facilities in the developing world. Journal of biomolecular techniques, 29(1):4-15. [https://doi.org/10.7171/jbt.18-2901-003]en_US
dc.identifier.issn1524-0215
dc.identifier.issn1943-4731 (Online)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/26848
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.7171/jbt.18-2901-003
dc.identifier.urihttp://jbt.abrf.org/jbt-static/index.cfm/page/jbt_toc.htm
dc.description.abstractThe developing world is seeing rapid growth in the availability of biological mass spectrometry (MS), particularly through core facilities. As proteomics and metabolomics becomes locally feasible for investigators in these nations, application areas associated with high burden in these nations, such as infectious disease, will see greatly increased research output. This article evaluates the rapid growth of MS in South Africa (currently approaching 20 laboratories) as a model for establishing MS core facilities in other nations of the developing world. Facilities should emphasize new services rather than new instruments. The reduction of the delays associated with reagent and other supply acquisition would benefit both facilities and the users who make use of their services. Instrument maintenance and repair, often mediated by an in-country business for an international vendor, is also likely to operate on a slower schedule than in the wealthiest nations. A key challenge to facilities in the developing world is educating potential facility users in how best to design experiments for proteomics and metabolomics, what reagents are most likely to introduce problematic artifacts, and how to interpret results from the facility. Here, we summarize the experience of 6 different institutions to raise the level of biological MS available to researchers in South Africaen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilitiesen_US
dc.subjectShared instrumentsen_US
dc.subjectPublication standardsen_US
dc.subjectCapacity developmenten_US
dc.subjectSouth Africaen_US
dc.titleChallenges and opportunities for biological mass spectrometry core facilities in the developing worlden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.researchID22713077 - Vorster, Barend Christiaan


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record