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dc.contributor.authorFouché, Elmari
dc.contributor.authorRothmann, Sebastiaan
dc.contributor.authorVan der Vyver, Corné
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-05T06:17:50Z
dc.date.available2018-06-05T06:17:50Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationFouché, E. et al. 2017. Antecedents and outcomes of meaningful work among school teachers. SA Journal Of Industrial Psychology, 43:1-10. [https://doi.org/10.4102/sajip.v43i0.1398]
dc.identifier.issn0258-5200
dc.identifier.issn2071-0763 (Online)
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.4102/sajip.v43i0.1398
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/27051
dc.description.abstractOrientation: Quality education is dependent on the well-being, engagement, performance and retention of teachers. Meaningful work might affect these employee and organisational outcomes. Research purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate antecedents and outcomes of meaningful work among school teachers. Motivation for the study: Meaningful work underpins people's motivation and affects their well-being and job satisfaction. Furthermore, it is a significant pathway to healthy and authentic organisations. However, a research gap exists regarding the effects of different antecedents and outcomes of meaningful work. Research approach, design and method: A cross-sectional survey was used with a convenience sample of 513 teachers. The Work-Life Questionnaire, Revised Job Diagnostic Survey, Co-worker Relations Scale, Work and Meaning Inventory, Personal Resources Scale, Work Engagement Scale, Turnover Intention Scale and a measure of self-rated performance were administered. Main findings: A calling orientation, job design and co-worker relations were associated with meaningful work. A low calling orientation and poor co-worker relationships predicted burnout. A calling orientation, a well-designed job, good co-worker relationships and meaningful work predicted work engagement. Job design was moderately associated with self-ratings of performance. The absence of a calling orientation predicted teachers' intention to leave the organisation. Practical/managerial implications: Educational managers should consider implementing interventions to affect teachers' calling orientation (through job crafting), perceptions of the nature of their jobs (by allowing autonomy) and co-worker relations (through teambuilding) to promote perceptions of meaningful work. Promoting perceptions of meaningful work might contribute to lower burnout, higher work engagement, better self-ratings of performance and retention of teachers. Contribution/value-add: This study contributes to scientific knowledge regarding the effects of three antecedents, namely a calling orientation, job design and co-worker relationships on meaningful work. It also contributed to knowledge about the effects of meaningful work on employee and organisational outcomes.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAOSIS
dc.subjectMeaningful work
dc.subjectwork beliefs
dc.subjectwork design
dc.subjectperformance
dc.subjectintention to leave
dc.subjectburnout
dc.subjectsecondary school teachers
dc.titleAntecedents and outcomes of meaningful work among school teachers
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.researchID20486758 - Van Der Vyver, Corné
dc.contributor.researchID10064699 - Rothmann, Sebastiaan


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