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dc.contributor.advisorOjakorotu, Victor
dc.contributor.authorAni, Kelechi Johnmary
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-29T05:48:03Z
dc.date.available2021-07-29T05:48:03Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-6617-1484
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/37080
dc.descriptionPhD (Peace Studies), North-West University, Mafikeng Campus, 2017en_US
dc.description.abstractIn time past, there was enough expanse of land that humanity had no need to compete or clash over land. However, as the population expanded in different gee-political environments, land became a 'scarce' resource. Man began to compete in the scramble and quest to retain available land spaces. The situation is made worse by the fact that land, as a means of production, is fixed. The implication was the rise of conflicting interests amongst land contestants. Ironically, Africa, more than any other continent in the globe, has experienced the most conflicts in the world. This study focused on peacebuilding strategies for the management of Ezza conflicts in Nigeria and Barolong land dispute in South Africa. The study relied on theories of negative and positive peace to explain the conflict setting. It adopted non-probability sampling strategy and employed a qualitative research approach. The researcher reviewed literature on Ezza and Barolong studies as well as the causes and forms of land conflicts in the study areas. The scholars in conflict studies have neglected Ezza and Barolong peoples. Consequently, the researcher traced the historical background of the conflicts ravaging Ezza and Barolong peoples for years. The socio-political, economic and security impacts of both conflicts were documented. The similarities and contrasts as well as the road to peace in all the conflict terrain were also identified in the study. It is recommended that multi-dimensional peacebuilding strategies be implemented in the study areas. The work spelt-out, how mediation, peace communication, negotiation, dialogue, intergroup forgiveness, peace education and peace journalism could lead to sustainable peace in Ezza conflict terrain in Nigeria and Barolong land dispute setting of South Africa. Finally, the study recommends community mobilization towards the culture of peace, identification of the fears of conflict parties, creation of early warning systems, peace-based workshops, peace jingles and adverts, as well as government driven peace campaigns and developmental projects as the road to sustainable peacebuilding.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNorth-West University (South Africa)en_US
dc.titleSustainable peacebuilding strategies for the management of Ezza conflicts in Nigeria and the Barolong Land Dispute in South Africaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.thesistypeDoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.researchID23590432 - Ojakorotu, Victor (Supervisor)(Supervisor)


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