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dc.contributor.advisorPienaar, A.E.
dc.contributor.advisorCoetzee, M.
dc.contributor.authorCloete, Eldi
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-04T09:31:27Z
dc.date.available2009-02-04T09:31:27Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/375
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A. (Human Movement Science))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2004.
dc.description.abstractChildren with coordination difficulties of a certain degree are classified with the DSM IV (American Psychological Association, 1994) as children with DCD (Developmental Coordination Disorder), clumsy or children with dyspraxia (Wright & Sugden, 1996:357). These children show developmental difficulties with some or all of the fundamental skills which can negatively influence their daily and school activities (Wright & Sugden, 1996:358). It is also indicated that children with coordination difficulties are usually not very active (Bouffard et al., 1996; Prinsloo & Pienaar, 2003). Activity which can place a child in the high active category is, however, essential for the development of cardio-respiratory functions (Peters & Wright, 1999). Sufficient physical activities also have a positive influence on motor difficulties (DCD) of children. Literature also shows that boys have more motor problems than girls, although they are more active than girls (Andersen et al., 1998:938; Boreham, et al, 1997:788; Leupker, 1999:14; Pate et al., 1994434; Trost et al., 1999:341). The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between DCD and physical activity of children in the age group 10-12 years in the Northwest province (N = 645). A second purpose was to examine the differences between low active boys and girls in the age group 10-12 years in the Northwest province classified as DCD (N = 429). A group of children was randomly selected from all the districts in the Northwest province, proportionally representing the different racial groups [White (n = 90), Black (n = 467), Coloured (n = 47), Indian (n = 41)]. In this group, 318 boys and 327 girls completed the Movement ABC (MABC) (Henderson & Sugden, 1992) and the Previous Day Physical Activity Recall (PDPAR) (Trost et al., 1999). For the analysis of the data, the Statistica for Windows computer package was used. The low active DCD group showed significant poorer ball skills than the higher active DCD group. A partial correlation analysis corrected for race, gender, age, fat percentage, weight, height, body mass index, physical activity and socio-economic status showed that socio-economic conditions and physical activity had the highest association with motor skill development of low active DCD children. Analysis of differences in physical activity levels of boys and girls with DCD showed that girls with DCD are less active than boys with DCD. Low and higher active boys and girls did not differ with regard to the different sub tests and MABC total, although the balance of higher active girls were poorer than that of the low active girls. The motor proficiency of the low active DCD boys and girls also did not show any significant differences. Overall, the conclusion can be made that a low physical activity level has a relationship with the motor proficiency of a 10-12 year old child who is classified with DCD.
dc.publisherNorth-West University
dc.titleDie verband tussen lae fisieke aktiwiteit en ontwikkelingskoördinasieversteuring ("DCD") by 10-12 jarige kinders in die Noordwesprovinsieafr
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.thesistypeMasters


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